Home   NAME LIST   Stories   Statistics   Links   Contact
 


 

Dale Jr Bud Racing
Dale Jr Bud...
Buy this Tin Sign for $12.99

Dale Sr Legacy of Racing
Dale Sr Legacy of...
Buy this Tin Sign for $12.99










 

 


Robert "Bob" Newman Flock
Born: April 16, 1918        Died:  May 16, 1964       Home: Fort Payne, Alabama
Brother Tim          Brother Fonty
 

Bob Flock of the famous racing Flock family was an early NASCAR driver. He qualified first for NASCAR's first race.

Flock family

He was the brother of NASCAR pioneers Tim Flock and Fonty Flock, and the second female NASCAR driver Ethel Mobley. The four raced at the July 10, 1949 race at the Daytona Beach Road Course, which was the first event to feature a brother and a sister, and the only NASCAR event to feature four siblings. Ethel beat Fonty and Bob by finishing in eleventh.

Moonshine business

The Flock family admittedly had an illegal moonshine business. The federal agents one discovered the Flock would be running a race in Atlanta, and they staked out the place to make an arrest. A gate opened as the race was beginning, and he drove on the track to take the green flag. The police vehicles quickly appeared on the track. They chased Flock for a lap or two before he drove through the fence. The police followed him until he ran out of gas later. Reminiscing years later, Bob said, "I would have won that race if the cops had stayed out of it".

Racing career

He was a well established driver before NASCAR was formed. He took over NASCAR founder Bill France's ride in 1946. He won both events at the Daytona Beach Road Course in 1947.

He sat on the pole for NASCAR's first race at Charlotte Speedway on June 19, 1949. He had two wins that season, and finished third in the points behind Lee Petty and champion Red Byron.

He won two 100 lap ARCA races at Lakewood Speedway in 1954.

Bob Flock retired from driving when he broke his back in an on track accident. He had over 200 modified wins in his career.

Track promoter

Flock became a track promoter in Atlanta. He hired three women, Sara Christian, and Mildred Williams, and his sister Ethel Mobley, to race at his new track.

Awards

  • He was inducted in the Georgia Automobile Racing Hall of Fame in 2003.

  • He is a member of the National Motorsports Hall of Fame Association.

#14 Bob Flock, just behind his brother Fonty

Don't forget the fabulous Flocks

By Gaylen Duskey, Special to Turner Sports Interactive     June 27, 2001

The Flock FamilyMany consider whiskey running to be the genesis of stock car racing. Much has been written or romanticized about those drivers. Robert Mitchum in Thunder Road is the image conjured up to many.

One NASCAR great, Junior Johnson, has always been considered the mold for such romantic road warriors. He's even been the subject of a book by Thomas Wolfe, 'The Last American Hero' that further romanticizes both the man and the image of the man. And as great of an example as Johnson is as a bridge from bootlegging to NASCAR racing, he may not be as good an example as were the Fabulous Flock Brothers -- Bob, Fonty and Tim.

They were bootleggers. Actually their uncle Peachtree Williams was the bootlegger and the two older Flock boys -- Bob and Fonty -- were his drivers. They came from their home in Ft. Payne, Ala., to make moonshine runs in rural Georgia back during the prohibition era. When they were not making runs they talked with other drivers about which car was the fastest. And that talk led to NASCAR ... if you follow the progression.

According to the story the drivers would find a pasture field somewhere and drive around in circles -- about a half mile circle -- until they had worn out a path in the grass. Then they would race. The Flocks were among the instigators of this racing. And the racing grew by word of mouth as a small crowd got a little larger and larger until some entrepreneurial people started building race tracks. It is from those tracks that NASCAR grew.

The Flock family as a whole was a very interesting family. There were eight children born to Lee and Maudie Flock and many of them were colorful, to say the least.

Carl, the oldest boy, was a speedboat racer. Reo, one of the girls, was a wing-walking daredevil. She also was a stunt parachutist. Another sister, Ethel, was a race car driver with more than 100 races. She had one Grand National (the precursor of NASCAR's Winston Cup) start and finished 11th.

Bob FlockThen there was the trio of Flock boys that actually made it onto the NASCAR circuit -- Bob, Fonty and Tim. Bob, the oldest, and Fonty got into racing first. They were competitors in the 'moonshine' races held in pastures in Georgia, which probably was the genesis of what is now NASCAR. They both drove those circuits in the years before NASCAR came along in 1949.

Bob, who was born in 1918, had the shortest career in NASCAR. He started when the circuit was founded in 1949 and raced until retiring in 1956. He had 36 career starts and won four races.

Fonty had a pretty good NASCAR career. He started 154 races and had 19 wins and 33 poles during a career that lasted from 1949 through 1957.

But the star of the family was Tim, the baby. He was one of the most colorful NASCAR drivers ever.

During his career he:

-- Raced with a monkey in his car.

-- Lost a race because of an in-car fight with the monkey.

-- Raced in a car with the number 300 painted on it.

-- Won a Grand National (Winston Cup) title driving a Hudson Hornet.

-- Won NASCAR's only sports car race driving a Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing.

-- Quit NASCAR racing altogether over a race ruling and opened a gasoline station only to be talked back into racing while watching time trials as a spectator and then going on to win that race.

-- Was banned from racing for life.

And on top of it all he was quite a driver winning 40 races (in 187 starts) and two Grand National titles in a career that started in 1949 and lasted until he was banned in 1961.

Quite a story? You bet.

Had Tim's older brothers had their way he may not have been a race car driver. They wanted him to stay away from racing and go to school. It did not work out that way. He tagged along with his older brothers to the race tracks and in 1948 he ran into a man, Bruce Thompson from Monroe, N.C., who had a car but no driver. He asked Tim to drive and before the year was out he was outrunning his older brothers.

The following year NASCAR started a 'strictly stock' circuit which eventually led to Grand National and Winston Cup. Tim competed on it and by 1952 had won his first championship in a Hudson Hornet, giving Hudson its only championship. The way he won the title was actually rather interesting since going into the last race of the season all he needed to do was to start to beat Herb Thomas, who he had waged a season-long battle with. He did more than start but on the 64th lap he rolled his car over. He later jokingly said "I bet I am the only guy who ever won a championship while on his head."

He had an affinity for laughing and for clowning around. Those two things led to his brief -- nine races -- stint with a rhesus monkey as his co-driver. For the first eight races Jocko Flocko, as the monkey was called, was fine as a co-driver. The ninth race was a different story. With Tim leading the race Jocko Flocko somehow broke out of his cage and went berserk in the race car at one time grabbing Tim by the neck. Tim subdued the monkey with one hand while driving with the other before pulling into the pits to get Jocko Flocko out of the car. His pit stop cost him the race he was leading before Jocko Flocko broke loose as he finished third.

He ended his career abruptly in 1954 after being disqualified in a race for an illegal part in his car. He went home to Atlanta and opened a gas station figuring he was through with racing. He was talked into going to Daytona by some friends of his in 1955 and that is where he saw them testing the new Chrysler 300. That car, and some cajoling by some friends, was all it took to get him back behind the wheel again.

The one thing that Flock found wrong with the Chrysler 300 was that it had an automatic shift. He did not think it would keep up with other cars going uphill on the beach at Daytona because of that. It did not and he finished second to Glenn 'Fireball' Roberts in that race. Ironically, Roberts was disqualified the next day and Flock was declared the winner.

That was the start of an awesome season as he teamed with car owner Carl Keikhaefer to have one of the greatest seasons in NASCAR history. Driving the number 300 Chrysler 300 he won the championship by winning 18 races and 19 poles.

He lasted only about a season and a half with Keikhaefer, who was a bit tyrannical with his drivers. He then began cutting back on his driving and by 1961 was working at Charlotte Motor Speedway and racing on a limited basis. It was at this time, however, that many NASCAR drivers started talking about unionizing going so far as to approach Jimmy Hoffa and the Teamsters about representing them.

The union idea fell apart and many of the drivers left the group, leaving only Flock and Curtis Turner, a former NASCAR driver who was his boss at Charlotte Motor Speedway, with that idea. NASCAR banned both for life. The lifetime ban was repealed in 1965 but Flock did not return to racing.

He was a pioneer. He was colorful. But, most of all, he was a very good racer. He died of cancer in 1998. He was the most colorful of The Fabulous Flock Brothers but they all need to be recognized as NASCAR pioneers.

Bob Flock, relaxing at Daytona Beach

Bob & Ruby Flock

 

Tim, ?, Fonty, Bob Flock

BOB FLOCK  -  RACE RESULTS

April 11, 1948      

     

Hayloft Speedway, Augusta, GA     

NASCAR Modified     

Finish: 1

May 29, 1948      

     

Greensboro Fairgrounds, Greensboro, NC     

NASCAR Modified     

Finish: 1

June 4, 1948      

     

Danville Speedway, Danville, VA     

NASCAR Modified     

Finish: 1

June 6, 1948      

     

Lakeview Speedway, Lexington, NC     

NASCAR Modified     

Finish: 1

June 20, 1948      

     

Columbus Speedway, Columbus, GA     

NASCAR Modified     

Finish: 1

June 19, 1949      

     

Charlotte Speedway, Charlotte, NC     

NASCAR Strictly Stock     

Finish: 32

July 10, 1949      

     

Daytona Beach Road Course, Daytona Beach, FL     

NASCAR Strictly Stock     

Finish: 22

August 7, 1949      

     

Occoneechee Speedway, Hillsboro, NC     

NASCAR Strictly Stock     

Finish: 1

September 11, 1949      

     

Langhorne Speedway, Langhorne, PA     

NASCAR Strictly Stock     

Finish:   2

September 25, 1949      

     

Martinsville Speedway, Martinsville, VA     

NASCAR Strictly Stock     

Finish: 14

October 16, 1949      

Wilkes 200     

N Wilkesboro Spdwy, NWilkesboro, NC     

NASCAR Strictly Stock     

Finish: 1

February 5, 1950      

     

Daytona Beach Road Course, Daytona Beach, FL     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish:   7

April 2, 1950      

     

Charlotte Speedway, Charlotte, NC     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish:   2

September 4, 1950      

Southern 500     

Darlington Raceway, Darlington, SC     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish: 27

September 24, 1950      

Wilkes 200     

North Wilkesboro Speedway, North Wilkesboro, NC     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish:   9

April 8, 1951      

     

Lakeview Speedway, Mobile, AL     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish:   8

May 6, 1951      

     

Martinsville Speedway, Martinsville, VA     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish: 10

May 30, 1951      

Poor Man's 500     

Canfield Speedway, Canfield, OH     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish:   6

June 10, 1951      

     

Columbus Speedway, Columbus, GA     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish: 29

June 16, 1951      

     

Columbia Speedway, Columbia, SC     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish: 13

July 29, 1951      

     

Asheville-Weaverville Speedway, Weaverville, NC     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish: 10

August 12, 1951      

Motor City250     

Michigan State Fairgrounds, Detroit, MI     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish: 20

August 25, 1951      

     

Greenville-Pickens Speedway, Greenville, SC     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish: 1

September 3, 1951      

Southern 500     

Darlington Raceway, Darlington, SC     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish: 27

September 7, 1951      

     

Columbia Speedway, Columbia, SC     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish:   4

September 8, 1951      

     

Central City Speedway, Macon, GA     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish: 18

September 15, 1951      

     

Langhorne Speedway, Langhorne, PA     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish: 30

September 23, 1951      

     

Charlotte Speedway, Charlotte, NC     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish: 16

September 30, 1951      

     

Wilson Speedway, Wilson, NC     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish:   2

October 21, 1951      

     

North Wilkesboro Speedway, North Wilkesboro, NC     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish: 10

November 11, 1951      

     

Lakewood Speedway, Atlanta, GA     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish:   2

November 25, 1951      

     

Lakeview Speedway, Mobile, AL     

NASCAR Grand National     

Finish: 20

September 6, 1954      

     

Lakewood Speedway, Atlanta, GA     

ARCA Stock Car     

Finish: 1

October 31, 1954      

     

Lakewood Speedway, Atlanta, GA     

ARCA Stock Car     

Finish: 1

Bob Flock Strictly Stock / Grand National Statistics

Year Age Races Win T5 T10 Pole Laps Led Earnings Rank AvSt AvFn Miles
1949 31 6 of 8 2 3 3 1 728 27 4,870 3 3.0 12.0 573.5
1950 32 4 of 19 0 1 3 0 595 5 1,180 20 8.5 11.2 781.0
1951 33 17 of 41 1 4 9 1 978 133 3,680 14 8.0 13.3 876.5
1952 34 2 of 34 1 1 1 0 538 1 1,060 73 30.5 15.0 522.5
1954 36 2 of 37 0 0 0 0 167 0 25     21.5 83.5
1955 37 1 of 45 0 1 1 0 195 0 650 62 8.0 5.0 292.5
1956 38 4 of 56 0 1 1 0 442 0 485 77 14.0 15.8 396.5
7 years 36 4 11 18 2 3643 166 11,950   10.4 13.4 3526.0
 

Brother Tim          Brother Fonty


Nascar Nextel Cup Series Tickets


Copyright 2003 LegendsofNascar.com by Roland Via. All rights reserved.  Revised: 06/08/12 08:11:21 -0400. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works. FAIR USE NOTICE: This web page may contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This page is operated under the assumption that this use on the Web constitutes a 'fair use' of the copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. Any text or images that you feel need to be removed please contact me. LegendsofNascar.com is not associated or affiliated with any racing club or organizations including that of NASCAR. It is constructed simply as an internet information source. Images and content made be used with email permission. Opinions and other content are not necessarily those of editors, sponsors. Please visit official NASCAR information website at NASCAR.COM.